RV Insurance 101

You probably bought your motor home or travel trailer because it offers the best of both worlds: the ability to explore the world we live in and the convenience of your home each night when you pull over. Motor homes and travel trailers offer a freedom and joy that’s unique regardless of the size of coach or fifth wheel you explore with.

But with this dual benefit also come some increased risks. As a vehicle, your motor home needs some auto-type insurance to protect you from crashes, medical costs and the like while you’re driving on the road. But comprehensive rv insurance needs to also protect you when you have stopped and camped. That means you need insurance closer to what you find in a homeowner’s policy that includes features such as:

Personal liability:

Protection in case someone is injured in or around your RV

Personal property:

Enhanced property insurance that will protect the contents of your RV in case of theft or damage.

Additional living expenses:

Protection that helps pay for your cost of living if you are displaced from your motor home.

Attached accessories:

Another layer of protection that covers your awning, tv antennas or other accessories that might be damaged.

Getting the right recreational vehicle insurance doesn’t have to be expensive or difficult with an insurance expert on your side.

Consider Vacation Liability coverage for when you stop driving and start using your recreational vehicle as a temporary residence. Some policies can include additional coverage for physical damage in Mexico.

Some policies include Roadside Assistance, which has you covered 24/7 in the event of a breakdown or accident. Some will even allow you to upgrade the coverage to include lodging, transportation, and meal coverage if needed.

Our claims service is available 24/7. In the event you have a loss, the insurance companies we work with have skilled claims teams who will work with you to get your RV repaired and back on the road.

Fire Up the Grill

A Personal Insurance and Safety Update

There are many good reasons to have homeowner’s or renter’s insurance, and here are a few more.

In 2019, 18,500 people went to emergency rooms because of barbeque related accidents.  Sixteen percent of home structure fires involving a grill were caused during ignition because something flammable was too close to the grill.  Twenty percent of all reported grill fires were a result of leaks or breaks.  Gas grills account for more home fires overall than do charcoal grills.  Emergency rooms see the use of gasoline on a charcoal grill as the most common error associated with burn cases.

You might think you know all you need to know about barbeque safety and grilling, but here are some reminders.  We want your grilling experience to be fun and safe for the entire family.

General Grilling Safety

Never barbeque inside, in a garage, on the roof, or on a second story deck.

Never leave your grill unattended.

If you are using a charcoal grill, let the lighter fluid soak into the coals a few minutes before lighting them so that any vapors have time to evaporate.  When you do light the coals, stand back.

Do not use lighter fluid on hot coals.

Open the grill lid before you light it

Do not wear loose fitting clothing.

Keep an extinguisher outside or close by.

Make sure you use the grill 10 feet away from your house.

Use the grill close to a water source.

Do not let raw meat sit out too long without being chilled or cooked.

Always wash your hands before and after handling food.

Do not over-indulge in alcohol while barbecuing.

We are committed to providing clients with the highest quality insurance plans available combined with some of the lowest possible rates. Whether you are shopping for auto insurance, home insurance, life or business insurance, we can help you obtain the best coverage available with the lowest rate possible.

Artisan Contractor Insurance

The category of artisan contractors, also known as casual contractors, includes many occupations that involve skilled work with tools at the customer’s premises. Carpenters, plumbers, electricians, roofers and tree surgeons are some of them. Also included are diverse other skilled service providers, such as interior decorators, piano tuners and exterminators.

Special insurance needs of this group include coverage for equipment and tools that are often moved around and for the value of work done for a customer until it is finished.

For many artisan contractors, the most cost effective and efficient way to obtain property and liability coverage is with a Business Owners Policy (BOP) especially tailored to their needs. Although marketed under a variety of names, these policies will typically have provisions similar to the BOP’s.

Property Insurance

The BOP covers real estate and other property that your business owns that is located at the described business premises. If your business rents or leases its premises, the BOP provides coverage for tenants’ improvements and betterments. These are fixtures, alterations, installations or additions that you have put into the space that cannot legally be removed from the landlord’s premises.

Your biggest personal property loss exposures, however, may involve valuable machinery and equipment that moves around from job to job and is not covered by the standard property insurance. Such movable property is insured by contracts that insurers call “floaters.”

An installer’s floater covers all kinds of machinery and equipment during transit, installation and testing at a customer’s premises. Even building materials may be covered, but the more usual coverage is for equipment or machinery that only contractors install, such as heating or air conditioning. The policy can be written to cover a single job or on a reporting form, meaning that you provide the insurer with information about each new contract you undertake.

A tools and equipment floater covers the insured property wherever it is used and may include such items as hand tools, power drills, hoisting machines and power pumps.

Liability Insurance

Given the possibility of a lawsuit should someone claim to have been harmed by your work, you will almost certainly need liability insurance.

If working as a subcontractor, your customer may require you to have Owners and Contractors Protective Liability (OCP) coverage. This protects either a property/business owner or a general contractor from possible liability arising from the negligent acts of an independent contractor or subcontractor hired to perform work on behalf of the insured. The actual purchaser of the policy is the independent contractor or subcontractor, but the protection is for the benefit of the property/business owner or general contractor for whom the work is being done.

Business Vehicle Insurance

Your personal auto policy probably provides coverage for some business use of your truck, van or other vehicle. A personal auto policy is unlikely to provide coverage, however, if the vehicle in question is used primarily in business. It will not provide coverage for any vehicle owned by a business. For those vehicles you must have a business auto policy.

If you’re driving a truck you own personally for a business purpose and get into an accident for which you are liable, an injured person could sue you personally. Will your personal auto policy have enough coverage to pay all the damages? If not, a lawsuit may be filed against your business. If you use personal vehicles for business, you want to be sure you have high enough limits to protect your business. You should discuss this with your insurance agent.

Workers’ Compensation Insurance

States have varying rules about when an employer must provide workers compensation insurance. If you have three or more employees, you should check with your state department of workers’ compensation to see if you are required to provide workers comp insurance.

Enjoy The 4th Of July And Be Safe

We are approaching our nation’s birthday, July 4th, and we hope everyone has a great day of celebration with friends and family. In 2019 over 7,800 people went to the emergency room as a result of fireworks-related injuries. There were an estimated 15,770 reported fires started by fireworks. These fires resulted in an estimated eight reported deaths, and $38 million in direct property damage. This is why it is a good idea to have a free home insurance review and quote, call us today!

Homeowner’s Insurance

If you over-celebrate and do have a loss or damage, please call our office. It is very likely that the claim would be covered under your homeowner’s insurance policy.

General 4th of July safety

Be a safe swimmer. Water sports and fireworks are two of the biggest pastimes for the Fourth of July celebrations, and these are both linked to numerous deaths and injuries each year. Never swim alone, and make sure that kids’ water play is adequately supervised at all times.

Be a safe boater. Never consume alcohol while driving a boat. Set water safety rules for your family and passengers.

Use alcohol responsibly. Alcohol and fireworks can be a hazardous and dangerous combination.

Use sunscreen. At the start of summer, skin is especially tender, so use a high SPF.

Keep alert for local weather conditions. Check to see if any warning signs or flags are posted.

Remember your pet. They are not used to all the fireworks, so keep them inside.

Grill safely. Before you use your grill, make sure all hoses are secure and leak-free. Never grill inside. Keep grill away for al structures.

Fireworks Safety

Never try to make your own fireworks.

Light fireworks on a smooth, flat surface away from the house, dry leaves, and flammable materials.

Only use legal store-bought fireworks.

Don’t point sparklers or fireworks at yourself or others.

Make sure spectators are out of range before lighting fireworks.

Always keep matches and lighter fluid far away from fireworks.

Read labels and carefully follow directions.

Only light fireworks on the ground and in areas that are dry and fire-resistant.

Don’t attempt to light multiple devices at the same time.

Never allow young children to handle fireworks or sparklers.

Teach children to “stop, drop, and roll” if their clothes catch fire.

Always keep a portable fire extinguisher close by. Also, keep a water hose or buckets of water nearby to put out fires.

Thanks to our sources

http://www.medicinenet.com

http://www.redcross.org/

http://www.protection1.com/